Emil Bjerrum-Bohr receives prestigious Junior Group Leader grant from the Lundbeck Foundation – University of Copenhagen

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26 August 2011

Emil Bjerrum-Bohr receives prestigious Junior Group Leader grant from the Lundbeck Foundation

Discovery Center scientist Emil Bjerrum-Bohr has been awarded 10 million kroner by the Lundbeck Foundation to establish his own research group at the Discovery Center and the NBIA.

The Lundbeck Foundation's award of 10 million kroner will be given over a period of 5 years, and it will be possible to create three new postdoc positions and one PhD position. This grant from the Lundbeck Foundation will allow him to establish and lead his own research group, the Amplitude Computation Group (CAMP), at the NBIA and the Discovery Center.

"My project is pioneering work with the goal of creating stronger connections between experimental and theoretical physics. With large experimental facilities like the LHC-accelerator at CERN, we are entering a new era of research, where particle physics must be understood on far smaller distances and at higher energy densities. The aim of the project is to find new methods for making accurate predictions of which particles will be formed in proton collisions at CERN. In particle physics these predictions are called scattering amplitudes. However, these new methods may also lead to an entirely new understanding of physics. That's where it gets really exciting!", explains Emil Bjerrum-Bohr.

Emil Bjerrum-Bohr received his PhD from the Niels Bohr Institute in 2004. He has had a successful international scientific career first in Great Britain and later in the U.S. at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton.. In 2009 he returned to Denmark to assume a newly established research position as Knud Højgaard Assistant Professor in particle physics at the NBIA. Emil Bjerrum-Bohr has been involved with the Discovery Center from its start in 2010, where he plays an essential role in the Discovery Center theory group.